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Wednesday’s Lesson’s on Pronouns (10/15)

Posted by Michelle on October 15, 2014 in Uncategorized |

5th Grade:

Demonstrative and Interrogative Pronouns

The demonstrative pronouns identify a specific pronoun(s). They stand alone (like the cheese.) The demonstrative pronouns are this, that, these, and those.

Example: That belongs to me.

Example: Are those yours?

-When using demonstrative pronouns, do not place a noun after them, as this will make them demonstrative adjectives instead of pronouns.

The interrogative pronouns are question words. The interrogative pronouns are what, which, who, whom, and whose.

Your turn:

Identify the demonstrative pronoun in each sentence. Then decide if it is referring to something near or something far.

1. That was the best book I have ever read!

2. Will you take these over to the neighbor’s house?

3. This is my favorite movie.

Choose the correct interrogative pronoun for each sentence.

1. (Which, What) book did you check out?

2. For (who, whom) did you buy that present?

3. (Which, What) is the date today?

6th Grade:

Indefinite Pronouns and Double Negatives

Indefinite pronouns get their name honestly – they are used to refer to something vague and “not for sure.” Some examples of indefinite pronouns are another, anyone, anything, each, either, everybody, something, nothing, other, all, most, none, some, etc.

When using indefinite pronouns, unless you were given prior information, you may not know who or what the pronouns is referring to. For example, if a sentence refers to “everybody,” unless you know who is part of that group, the word “everybody,” is indefinite, not giving you a certain answer about who we are talking about.

Indefinite pronouns such as no one, nobody, none, and nothing are negative words. In a sentence, they can never be used with other negative words such as no, not, and never. Combining two negatives in a sentence is an error called a double negative.

Incorrect: No one didn’t come to the meeting

Correct: No one comes to the meeting

Your turn:

Choose the correct indefinite pronoun to complete each sentence:

1. There wasn’t (anything, nothing) to do on our day off school.

2. It was so dark, I couldn’t see (anything, nothing).

3. There was (anything, nothing) left to eat in the refrigerator.

 

7th and 8th Grade:

Relative and Indefinite Pronouns

A relative pronoun is used to join a dependent clause to its antecedent in the independent clause. The relative pronouns are who, whom, which, that, and whose.

Example: The student who earned first place received a scholarship.

-independent clause: The student received a scholarship.

-dependent clause: who earned first place

Indefinite Pronouns – see list and explanation in 6th grade section.

Your turn:

Identify the relative pronoun and its antecedent in each sentence. 

1. The flu bug that is going around our school is not fun to get.

2. The flu, which can last for many days, will keep you out of school feeling very sick.

3. Mrs. Harris, who got a flu shot, is hoping she will not get the flu.

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Tuesday’s Lessons on Pronouns

Posted by Michelle on October 14, 2014 in Uncategorized |

5th Grade:

Pronouns and Contractions

Here is a list of common contractions using pronouns:

I’m = I am                           I’ve = I have

You’re = you are               You’ve = you have

We’re = we are                  We’ve = we have

They’re = they are             They’ve = they have

He’s = he is or he has        She’s = she is or she has

It’s = it is or it has

 

Your turn:

Identify the contraction in each sentence. Write the words that make up the contraction.

1. I’ve read a lot of interesting books.

2. If you’re going to be in the choir, you must sing!

3. If we don’t hurry, we’ll all be late.

 

6th Grade:

Indefinite Pronouns

An indefinite pronoun refers to any or all of a group of people, places, or things.

Singular Examples: another, anybody, anyone, anything, each, either, everybody, everyone, everything, much, neither, nobody, no one, nothing, one, other, somebody, someone, something

Plural Examples: both, few, many, others, several

Singular or Plural Examples: all, any, more, most, none, some

Your turn:

Identify the indefinite pronoun in each sentence. Decide if it is singular or plural.

1. We found that we were able to do all the work ourselves.

2. Most of it was quite easy.

3. There was nothing left for us to do.

 

7th Grade:

Relative Pronouns

A relative pronoun is used to join a dependent clause to its antecedent in the independent clause. Relative pronouns are who, whom, which, that, and whose.

Example: The student who earned first place won a scholarship.

Example: English class, which is fun, teaches us great things.

Your turn:

Identify the relative pronoun in each sentence. Then identify its antecedent.

1. The English test that is on Friday will cover relative pronouns.

2. Mrs. Harris, who is an awesome teacher, enjoys English class.

3. English, which is scary to many people, is a necessary subject in school.

 

8th Grade:

Interrogative and Demonstrative Pronouns

Interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions. These pronouns are who, whom, whose, which, and what.

Demonstrative pronouns point out a particular person, place or thing. They are this, that, these, and those.

Example: Who has been out of the country before? (interrogative)

Example: These are some pictures of my trip. (demonstrative)

Your turn:

Complete each question with an interrogative pronoun:

1. By ________________ will you sit?

2. _________________ brought the appetizers?

3. _________________ of your brothers is the tallest?

 

Complete each sentence with a demonstrative pronoun:

1. Are ________________ yours over there by the door?

2. No, only ___________________ one here is mine.

3. _________________ one belongs to him.

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Review Over Pronouns

Posted by Michelle on September 29, 2014 in Uncategorized |

Hey kids!

Here are some review questions for you to help study for your test on Wednesday. Let me know if you have any questions!

Grade 5:

Uses of Pronouns

Circle the personal pronoun and underline its antecedent in each item.

1. Ms. Hayden is the math teacher. She is very helpful.

2. Mrs. Costello has a pet library. The animals belong to her.

3. The eighth graders will graduate this year. They are very excited.

 

Possessive Pronouns and Adjectives

Underline the possessive in each sentence. Then decide if it is a possessive pronoun or a possessive adjective.

1. The book on the desk is mine.

2. Her cat has orange fur.

3. Is that your brother?

 

Intensive and Reflexive Pronouns

Underline the pronoun in each sentence. Then label it intensive or reflexive.

1. I myself love learning about proper grammar.

2. Mrs. Scherle recently bought herself a Kindle.

3. The student council planned the Resting After Testing party by themselves.

 

Grade 6:

Possessive Pronouns and Adjectives

Underline the possessive in each sentence. Then decide if it is a possessive pronoun or a possessive adjective.

1. The book on the desk is mine.

2. Her cat has orange fur.

3. Is that your brother?

 

Pronouns in Contractions

Underline the contraction in each sentence. Then write the two words that make up the contraction

1. Miss Biver said that she’ll be in the gym at lunch time.  _________________________

2. We all agreed that we’d be quiet in the hallway. _______________________________

3. You’ll all do great on the test tomorrow! _________________________________

 

Demonstrative Pronouns

Circle the demonstrative pronoun in each sentence.

1. Those belong to me.

2. Mrs. Harris said, “This is just ridiculous!”

3. That is hilarious!

 

Interrogative Pronouns

Circle the interrogative pronoun that correctly completes the sentence.

1. For (who, whom, whose) did you buy that gift?

2. (What, which) is your favorite food?

3. (Who, whom, whose) is that?

 

Grades 7 and 8:

Person, Number, and Gender of Pronouns

Underline the personal pronoun in each sentence. Then tell what person, number, and gender it is.

1. You all will do a great job on the test tomorrow. _________   ___________  __________

2. That book belongs to him.   _____________   _____________   ______________

3. I enjoy eating tomato soup. ______________   _______________    _______________

 

Subject and Object Pronouns

Circle the pronoun in each sentence. Then identify if it is being used as a subject, subject complement, direct object, indirect object, or object of a preposition.

1. Mrs. Voegtle helped me with choir practice.           S          SC         DO        IO           OP

2. You are very good at kickball.                                S          SC         DO        IO           OP

3. The ones who earned the grade were they.           S          SC         DO        IO           OP

4. Mrs. K. gave me some great advice.                      S           SC         DO        IO           OP

5. The lessons were written by me.                            S            SC         DO       IO            OP

 

Pronouns After Than or As

Circle the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence.

1. Sally is a much better singer than (I, me).

2. Roller coasters scare me as much as (she, her.)

3. I struggle with social studies as much as (he, him)

4. I enjoy baseball more than (they, them).

 

Possessive Pronouns and Adjectives

Underline the possessive in each sentence. Then decide if it is a possessive pronoun or a possessive adjective.

1. The book on the desk is mine.

2. Her cat has orange fur.

3. Is that your brother?

 

Grade 8:

Intensive and Reflexive Pronouns

Underline the pronoun in each sentence. Then label it intensive or reflexive.

1. I myself love learning about proper grammar.

2. Mrs. Scherle recently bought herself a Kindle.

3. The student council planned the Resting After Testing party by themselves.

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Pronouns Following “Than” or “As”

Posted by Michelle on September 18, 2014 in Grammar, Language Arts |

5th and 6th grade –

We went over your test results today, please let me know if you need anything from me.

 

7th and 8th grade –

Today we will discuss pronouns when they follow the words “than” or “as.”

 

I found this excerpt online and I think it is well stated with good examples, so here it is:

“To decide whether to use the subject or object pronoun after the words than or as, mentally complete the sentence.

Examples:
Tranh is as smart as she/her.
If we mentally complete the sentence, we would say Tranh is as smart as she is. Therefore, she is the correct answer.

Zoe is taller than I/me.
Mentally completing the sentence, we have Zoe is taller than I am.

Daniel would rather talk to her than I/me.
We can interpret this sentence in two ways: Daniel would rather talk to her than to me.OR Daniel would rather talk to her than I would. A sentence’s meaning can change considerably, depending on the pronoun you choose.”

(from grammarbook.com)

 

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Object Pronouns

Posted by Michelle on September 17, 2014 in Grammar, Language Arts |

5th and 6th grade –

We tested today so there is no new information. You know the drill if you want more practice.

 

7th and 8th grade –

Remember yesterday when I said we would talk about object pronouns as time goes on? Well it has gone on and we are here!

 

Pronouns as Direct Objects –

If a pronoun comes after a verb and answers the question “Verb what?” or “Verb who?” then it is a direct object.

*Example: Mrs. Scherle took it out of the box.

Subject – Mrs. Scherle

Verb – took

Took what? it

It = direct object

 

Pronouns as Indirect Objects –

If a pronoun comes between a verb and a direct object and receives the action from the verb, it is an indirect object

*Example: Mrs. Costello asked you a question.

Subject – Mrs. Costello

Verb – asked

Direct Object – question (asked what)

Indirect Object – you (of whom?)

You = indirect object

 

Pronouns as Objects of Prepositions

We have looked a prepositional phrases many times now. If you have a prepositional phrase with a pronoun in it, your pronoun is the object of a preposition.

*Example: Ms. Hayden is going to lunch with them.

Subject – Ms. Hayden

Verb – is going

Prepositional Phrase – to lunch

Prepositional Phrase – with them

them = pronoun = object of a preposition

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